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Propane vs Natural Gas Grills: What's the Difference?

Propane vs Natural Gas Grills: What's the Difference?

When it comes to outdoor grilling, every aspiring backyard bon vivant has their own particular (and sometimes quite strident) opinions on which are the best meats, the best rubs, the best tools, and the best grills—which inevitably leads to the ultimate contention: propane vs natural gas (sorry, charcoal, you’re not invited this time). And that leads to people asking the perfectly reasonable question:

“Is there a difference between propane and natural gas grills?"

Definitely! And these two types of grills are different in more ways than one. Here, we’ll explain the differences, pros, and cons of each so you can make the best decision for you when buying a quality grill. Ready? Let’s get cooking!

What is a Liquid Propane Grill?

Liquid Propane Grill

A liquid propane grill is fueled by small, replaceable tanks that sit beside or inside your grill. These tanks can usually be found at grill suppliers, hardware stores, or even gas stations, and are easy to attach and detach. This grill requires no permanent gas line to be attached to your home or other source, saving you start-up money and sparing your backyard from being dug up. But you will need a hose and regulator to hook up the tanks.

As for the fuel itself, liquid propane has twice the energy of natural gas and it burns more efficiently by that same factor, which is good. But it is also more expensive in most places, and you’ll always have to keep in mind how much propane your tank has remaining, so you don’t run out at the wrong time during barbecue season.

Here are a couple of prime examples of liquid propane grills…

DCS BH136RL

BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL
BH136RL

This 36-inch Heritage Series built-in gas grill has three sealed stainless-steel burners, a rotisserie with its own infrared burner, and a layer of ceramic rods for even heating that puts out a fierce 92,500 BTU per hour total power. Its amenities include double-sided stainless-steel grates—one side for delicate foods, the other for getting those perfect sear marks—that channel grease into a removable drip tray. It also has a dedicated sealed smoker so you can add your own unique flavor to your foods and a SmartBeam interior grill light to illuminate the entire grilling surface.

Hestan GMBR36LP

GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP
GMBR36LP

This 36-inch wide built-in grill sports two precision-controlled burners along with a multipurpose rotisserie cooker and a ceramic sear burner putting out 75,000 BTUs. The hood is spring-assisted for easy opening with motion-activated, under-hood stadium lighting. Its stainless steel DiamondCut grates distribute heat evenly and deliver fantastic sear marks. A marquise-accented control panel and hood handle with commercial grade end caps provide industry-exclusive durability and style. And this grill is available in several gorgeous color options to really make it stand out.

What is a Natural Gas Grill?

Natural Gas Grill

Natural gas grills are fueled by a direct line the natural gas system of your home. If you don’t have natural gas installed already, the original set-up may cost a bit. But since natural gas is cheaper than liquid propane, this will prove less expensive in the long run.

In addition to the economic sense, with a direct gas line you will never have to consider if or when you can open the hood and start grilling. It’s always ready to go. If outdoor grilling is a major part of your life, then natural gas would be a good choice.

Natural gas also burns cleaner than propane, so you never have to worry about which way the wind is blowing—you and your guests will breathe easy.

Here are a couple of quality natural gas grills for your perusal…

Lynx L700NG

L700NG
L700NG
L700NG

The Sedona Series L700 42-inch built-in grill carries three stainless steel tube burners that fire up to 69,000 BTUs under 1,049 sq. in of stainless-steel grating cooking surface, with ceramic radiant briquettes providing even heating. The body is constructed from seamless, shimmering steel with no gaps or lines where moisture could collect, including the spring-assisted hood that makes for effortless opening. Halogen lighting illuminates the interior, while each control knob emits a calm blue light. And it all starts with the Lynx Spark ignition system, lighting the grill quickly and safely with just the push of a knob.

Lynx L700NG

XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N
XOGRILL42N

This 42-inch Pro Grade Luxury Grill is loaded with three 22,000-BTU stainless steel burners, a 22,000-BTU infrared variable ceramic burner and a rotisserie with an 11,000-BTU rear burner under heavy welded grates offering 1,235 sq. in. of searing cooking surface. Ceramic briquettes distribute heat evenly, and each burner compartment is segmented so you can cook at different temperatures at the same time. The hood is spring-assisted for effortless opening and carries independently controlled interior halogen lights, while the controls are illuminated by LED lights.

CONCLUSION

So, now you know the differences between liquid propane and natural gas grills. But what do you think? Do you have a personal preference between the two? And if so, why? Perhaps you have your own experiences with either type of grill you’d like to share with us?

After all, your knowledge may help others decide which fuel source is better for them. Leave a comment down below and let us know what you think.